29 Crossroads Drive •  Fulton, NY  •  315-592-2400
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TREATMENTS

& PROCEDURES

FAMILY DENTISTRY    •    COSMETIC DENTISTRY    •    DENTAL IMPLANTS    •    DENTAL CROWNS    •    ROOT CANALS    •    TMJ TREATMENT    •    DENTURES    •    PERIODONTAL TREATMENT 

 

FAMILY DENTISTRY

Contact Dental Health Solutions for Family Dentistry in Fulton NY

At Dental Health Solutions, we want all our patients to enjoy only the best in dental health. We believe the best way to provide this is by offering quality, comprehensive services to the entire family in one location. We see patients from the area from the age of 3 on up.

Convenient, Personalized Care

A family dentist is educated and experienced in providing oral care for people of all ages. Dr. Juan Lopez and Dr. Yamilka Serrano at Dental Health Solutions are able to address oral health problems for all age groups. They have studied the development of teeth through all stages of life and remain on top of developments through continuing education and their engagement with professional organizations. Drs. Lopez and Serrano invest themselves for the betterment of their patients oral health!

Preventive Care

At our Fulton-based practice, we strive to prevent dental problems at every age. Our staff works together to educate patients about their dental health and help build a strong at-home oral care routine. Building a trusting relationship between dentist and patients is important, even more so for the younger patients. It helps prevent dental phobias and builds a trusting relationship between dentist and patient.

Preventative care for the whole family includes several types of procedures and treatments. Young children may have sealants placed and fluoride treatments. As children age, their bite is carefully watched as secondary teeth grow in. Dental Health Solutions helps young athletes with sport mouth guards to protect their smile. Cosmetic procedures can help restore a beautiful smile. Procedures such as crowns for severely damaged teeth and dental implants for lost teeth in order to maintain a beautiful and fully functioning bite. 

 
CARE FOR YOUR CHILD'S TEETH

Care for Your Child’s Teeth 

Pediatric oral care has two main components: preventive care at the dentist’s office and preventive care at home. Dental decay is one of the most common chronic conditions of childhood in the United States. Untreated tooth decay can cause pain and infection which can lead to problems with eating, speaking, playing and learning. 

The goal of preventative oral care is to evaluate and preserve the health of the child’s teeth.  Beginning at the age of twelve months, the American Dental Association (ADA) recommends that children begin to visit the dentist for “well baby” checkups. In general, most children should continue to visit the dentist every six months, unless instructed otherwise.

How can a dentist care for my child’s teeth?

The dentist examines the teeth for signs of early decay, monitors orthodontic concerns, tracks jaw and tooth development, and provides a good resource for parents. In addition, the dentist has several tools at hand to further reduce the child's risk for dental problems, such as topical fluoride and dental sealants.

During a routine visit to the dentist: the child’s mouth will be fully examined; the teeth will be professionally cleaned; topical fluoride might be coated onto the teeth to protect tooth enamel, and any parental concerns can be addressed. The dentist can demonstrate good brushing and flossing techniques, advise parents on dietary issues, provide strategies for thumb sucking and pacifier cessation, and communicate with the child on his or her level.

When molars emerge (usually between the ages of 6 and 7), the dentist may recommend coat them with dental sealant.  This sealant covers the hard-to-reach fissures on the molars, sealing out bacteria, food particles, and acid. Dental sealant may last for many months or many years, depending on the oral habits of the child.Dental sealant is an important tool in the fight against tooth decay.

How can I help at home?

Though most parents primarily think of brushing and flossing when they hear the words “oral care,” good preventative care includes many more factors, such as:

Diet – Parents should provide children with a nourishing, well-balanced diet. Very sugary diets should be modified and continuous snacking should be discouraged. Oral bacteria ingest leftover sugar particles in the child’s mouth after each helping of food, emitting harmful acids that erode tooth enamel, gum tissue, and bone.  Space out snacks when possible, and provide the child with non-sugary alternatives like celery sticks, carrot sticks, and low-fat yogurt.

Oral habits – Though pacifier use and thumb sucking generally cease over time, both can cause the teeth to misalign.If the child must use a pacifier, choose an “orthodontically” correct model.This will minimize the risk of developmental problems like narrow roof arches and crowding.The dentist can suggest a strategy for thumb sucking cessation.

General oral hygiene – Sometimes, parents clean pacifiers and teething toys by sucking on them. Parents may also share eating utensils with the child. By performing these acts, parents transfer harmful oral bacteria to their child, increasing the risk of early cavities and tooth decay.Instead, rinse toys and pacifiers with warm water, and avoid spoon-sharing whenever possible.

Sippy cup use – Sippy cups are an excellent transitional aid when transferring from a baby bottle to an adult drinking glass. However, sippy cups filled with milk, breast milk, soda, juice, and sweetened water cause small amounts of sugary fluid to continually swill around young teeth – meaning acid continually attacks tooth enamel.Sippy cup use should be terminated between the ages of twelve and fourteen months or as soon as the child has the motor skills to hold a drinking glass.

Brushing – Children’s teeth should be brushed a minimum of two times per day using a soft bristled brush and a pea-sized amount of toothpaste. Parents should help with the brushing process until the child reaches the age of seven and is capable of reaching all areas of the mouth.  Parents should always opt for ADA approved toothpaste (non-fluoridated before the age of two, and fluoridated thereafter).  For babies, parents should rub the gum area with a clean cloth after each feeding.

Flossing – Cavities and tooth decay form more easily between teeth.  Therefore, the child is at risk for between-teeth cavities wherever two teeth grow adjacent to each other.The dentist can help demonstrate correct head positioning during the flossing process and suggest tips for making flossing more fun!

Fluoride – Fluoride helps prevent mineral loss and simultaneously promotes the remineralization of tooth enamel.  Too much fluoride can result in fluorosis, a condition where white specks appear on the permanent teeth, and too little can result in tooth decay.  It is important to get the fluoride balance correct.  The pediatric dentist can evaluate how much the child is currently receiving and prescribe supplements if necessary.

If you have questions or concerns about how to care for your child’s teeth, please ask your dentist.

 
DOES YOUR CHILD GRIND HIS OR HER TEETH AT NIGHT?

Does Your Child Grind His or Her Teeth at Night? 

Bruxism, or the grinding of teeth, is remarkably common in children and adults.  For some children, this tooth grinding is limited to daytime hours, but nighttime grinding (during sleep) is most prevalent.  Bruxism can lead to a wide range of dental problems, depending on the frequency of the behavior, the intensity of the grinding, and the underlying causes of the grinding.

A wide range of psychological, physiological, and physical factors may lead children to brux.  In particular, jaw misalignment (bad bite), stress, and traumatic brain injury are all thought to contribute to bruxism, although grinding can also occur as a side effect of certain medications.

What are some symptoms of bruxism?

In general, parents can usually hear intense grinding – especially when it occurs at nighttime. Subtle daytime jaw clenching and grinding, however, can be difficult to pinpoint.  Oftentimes, general symptoms provide clues as to whether or not the child is bruxing, including:

  • Frequent complaints of headache.

  • Injured teeth and gums.

  • Loud grinding or clicking sounds.

  • Rhythmic tightening or clenching of the jaw muscles.

  • Unusual complaints about painful jaw muscles – especially in the morning.

  • Unusual tooth sensitivity to hot and cold foods.

 

How can bruxism damage my child’s teeth?

Bruxism is characterized by the grinding of the upper jaw against the lower jaw.  Especially in cases where there is vigorous grinding, the child may experience moderate to severe jaw discomfort, headaches, and ear pain.  Even if the child is completely unaware of nighttime bruxing (and parents are unable to hear it), the condition of the teeth provides your pediatric dentist with important clues.

First, chronic grinders usually show an excessive wear pattern on the teeth.  If jaw misalignment is the cause, tooth enamel may be worn down in specific areas.  In addition, children who brux are more susceptible to chipped teeth, facial pain, gum injury, and temperature sensitivity.  In extreme cases, frequent, harsh grinding can lead to the early onset of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJ).

What causes bruxism?

Bruxism can be caused by several different factors. Most commonly, “bad bite” or jaw misalignment promotes grinding.  Pediatric dentists also notice that children tend to brux more frequently in response to life stressors.  If the child is going through a particularly stressful exam period or is relocating to a new school for example, nighttime bruxing may either begin or intensify.

Children with certain developmental disorders and brain injuries may be at particular risk for grinding.  In such cases, your pediatric dentist may suggest botulism injections to calm the facial muscles, or provide a protective nighttime mouthpiece.  If the onset of bruxing is sudden, current medications need to be evaluated.  Though bruxing is a rare side effect of specific medications, the medication itself may need to be switched for an alternate brand.

How is bruxism treated?

Bruxing spontaneously ceases by the age of thirteen in the majority of children.  In the meantime however, your dentist will continually monitor its effect on the child’s teeth and may provide an interventional strategy. In general, the cause of the grinding dictates the treatment approach.  If the child’s teeth are badly misaligned, your pediatric dentist may take steps to correct this.  Some of the available options include: altering the biting surface of teeth with crowns, and beginning occlusal treatment.

If bruxing seems to be exacerbated by stress, your pediatric dentist may recommend relaxation classes, professional therapy, or special exercises.  The child’s pediatrician may also provide muscle relaxants to alleviate jaw clenching and reduce jaw spasms.

In cases where young teeth are sustaining significant damage, your pediatric dentist may suggest a specialized nighttime dental appliance such as a nighttime mouth guard.  Mouth guards stop tooth surfaces from grinding against each other, and look similar to a mouthpiece a person might wear during sports.  Bite splints or bite plates fulfill the same function and are almost universally successful in preventing grinding damage.

If you have questions or concerns about bruxism or grinding teeth, please contact our office.

 
FLOURIDE

Fluoride Supplements from Dental Health Solutions 

Fluorine, a natural element in the fluoride compound, has proven to be effective in minimizing childhood cavities and tooth decay.  Fluoride is a key ingredient in many popular brands of toothpaste, oral gel, and mouthwash, and can also be found in most community water supplies.  Though fluoride is an important part of any good oral care routine, overconsumption can result in a condition known as fluorosis.  The pediatric dentist is able to monitor fluoride levels, and check that children are receiving the appropriate amount.

How can fluoride prevent tooth decay?

Fluoride fulfills two important dental functions.  First, it helps staunch mineral loss from tooth enamel, and second, it promotes the remineralization of tooth enamel.

When carbohydrates (sugars) are consumed, oral bacteria feed on them and produce harmful acids.  These acids attack tooth enamel - especially in children who take medications or produce less saliva.  Repeated acid attacks result in cavities, tooth decay, and childhood periodontal disease.  Fluoride protects tooth enamel from acid attacks and reduces the risk of childhood tooth decay.

Fluoride is especially effective when used as part of a good oral hygiene regimen.  Reducing the consumption of sugary foods, brushing and flossing regularly, and visiting the pediatric dentist biannually, all supplement the work of fluoride and keep young teeth healthy.

How much fluoride is enough?

Since community water supplies and toothpastes usually contain fluoride, it is essential that children do not ingest too much.  For this reason, children under the age of two should use an ADA-approved, non-fluoridated brand of toothpaste.  Children between the ages of two and five years old should use a pea-sized amount of ADA-approved fluoridated toothpaste, on a clean toothbrush, twice each day.  They should be encouraged to spit out any extra fluid after brushing.  This part might take time, encouragement, and practice.

The amount of fluoride children ingest between the ages of one and four years old determines whether or not fluorosis occurs later.  The most common symptom of fluorosis is white specks on the permanent teeth.  Children over the age of eight years old are not considered to be at-risk for fluorosis, but should still use an ADA-approved brand of toothpaste.

Does my child need fluoride supplements?

The pediatric dentist is the best person to decide whether a child needs fluoride supplements.  First, the dentist will ask questions in order to determine how much fluoride the child is currently receiving, gain a general health history, and evaluate the sugar content in the child’s diet.  If a child is not receiving enough fluoride and is determined to be at high-risk for tooth decay, an at-home fluoride supplement might be recommended.

Topical fluoride can also be applied to the tooth enamel quickly and painlessly during a regular office visit.  There are many convenient forms of topical fluoride, including foam, liquids, varnishes, and gels.  Depending on the age of the child and their willingness to cooperate, topical fluoride can either be held on the teeth for several minutes in specialized trays or painted on with a brush.

If you have questions or concerns about fluoride or fluorosis, please contact our office.

 
GOOD DIET

Good Diet and Oral Health

A child’s general level of health often dictates his or her oral health, and vice versa.  Therefore, supplying children with a well-balanced diet is more likely to produce healthier teeth and gums. A good diet provides the child with the many different nutrients he or she needs to grow. These nutrients are necessary for gum tissue development, strong bones, and protection against certain illnesses.

According to the food pyramid, children need vegetables, fruits, meat, grains, beans, and dairy products to grow properly.  These different food groups should be eaten in balance for optimal results.

How does my child’s diet affect his or her teeth?

Almost every snack contains at least one type of sugar.  Most often, parents are tempted to throw away candy and chocolate snacks – without realizing that many fruit snacks contain one (if not several) types of sugar or carbohydrate.  When sugar-rich snacks are eaten, the sugar content attracts oral bacteria. The bacteria feast on food remnants left on or around the teeth.  Eventually, feasting bacteria produce enamel-attacking acids.

When tooth enamel is constantly exposed to acid, it begins to erode – the result is childhood tooth decay.  If tooth decay is left untreated for prolonged periods, acids begin to attack the soft tissue (gums) and even the underlying jawbone.  Eventually, the teeth become prematurely loose or fall out, causing problems for emerging adult teeth – a condition known as childhood periodontal disease.

Regular checkups and cleanings at the pediatric dentist’s office are an important line of defense against tooth decay.  However, implementing good dietary habits and minimizing sugary food and drink intake as part of the “home care routine” are equally important.

How can I alter my child’s diet?

The pediatric dentist is able to offer advice and dietary counseling for children and parents.  Most often, parents are advised to opt for healthier snacks, for example, carrot sticks, reduced fat yoghurt, and cottage cheese.  In addition, pediatric dentists may recommend a fluoride supplement to protect tooth enamel – especially if the child lives in an area where fluoride is not routinely added to community water.

Parents should also ensure that children are not continuously snacking – even in a healthy manner.  Lots of snacking means that sugars are constantly attaching themselves to teeth, and tooth enamel is constantly under attack.  It is also impractical to try to clean the teeth after every snack, if “every snack” means every ten minutes!

Finally, parents are advised to opt for faster snacks.  Mints and hard candies remain in the mouth for a long period of time - meaning that sugar is coating the teeth for longer.  If candy is necessary, opt for a sugar-free variety or a variety that can be eaten expediently.

Should my child eat starch-rich foods?

It is important for the child to eat a balanced diet, so some carbohydrates and starches are necessary.  Starch-rich foods generally include pretzels, chips, and peanut butter and jelly sandwiches.  Since starches and carbohydrates break down to form sugar, it is best that they are eaten as part of a meal (when saliva production is higher), than as a standalone snack.  Provide plenty of water at mealtimes (rather than soda) to help the child rinse sugary food particles off the teeth.

As a final dietary note, avoid feeding your child sticky foods if possible.  It is incredibly difficult to remove stickiness from the teeth - especially in younger children who tend not to be as patient during brushing.

If you have questions or concerns about your child’s general or oral health, please contact our office.

 
HOW TO PREVENT CAVITIES

How to Prevent Cavities 

Childhood cavities, also known as childhood tooth decay and childhood caries, are common in children all over the world.  There are two main causes of cavities: poor dental hygiene and sugary diets.

Cavities can be incredibly painful and often lead to tooth decay and childhood periodontitis if left untreated. Ensuring that children eat a balanced diet, embarking on a sound home oral care routine, and visiting the pediatric dentist biannually are all crucial factors for both cavity prevention and excellent oral health.

What causes cavities?

Cavities form when children’s teeth are exposed to sugary foods on a regular basis.  Sugars and carbohydrates (like the ones found in white bread) collect on and around the teeth after eating.  A sticky film (plaque) then forms on the tooth enamel.  The oral bacteria within the plaque continually ingest sugar particles and emit acid.  Initially, the acid attacks the tooth enamel, weakening it and leaving it vulnerable to tooth decay.  If conditions are allowed to worsen, the acid begins to penetrate the tooth enamel and erodes the inner workings of the tooth.

Although primary (baby) teeth are eventually lost, they fulfill several important functions and should be protected.  It is essential that children brush and floss twice per day (ideally more), and visit the dentist for biannual cleanings.  Sometimes the pediatric dentist coats teeth with a sealant and provides fluoride supplements to further bolster the mouth’s defenses.

How will I know if my child has a cavity?

Large cavities can be excruciatingly painful, whereas tiny cavities may not be felt at all.  Making matters even trickier, cavities sometimes form between the teeth, making them invisible to the naked eye.  Dental X-rays and the dentist’s trained eyes help pinpoint even the tiniest of cavities so they can be treated before they worsen.

Some of the major symptoms of cavities include:

  • Heightened sensitivity to cool or warm foods

  • Nighttime waking and crying

  • Pain

  • Sensitivity to spicy foods

  • Toothache

 

If a child is experiencing any of these symptoms, it is important to visit the pediatric dentist.  Failure to do so will make the problem worse, leave the child in pain, and possibly jeopardize a tooth that could have been treated.

How can I prevent cavities at home?

How can I prevent cavities at home?

Biannual visits with the pediatric dentist are only part of the battle against cavities.  Here are some helpful guidelines for cavity prevention:

  1. Analyze the diet – Too many sugary or starchy snacks can expedite cavity formation.  Replace sugary snacks like candy with natural foods where possible, and similarly, replace soda with water.

  2. Cut the snacks – Snacking too frequently can unnecessarily expose teeth to sugars.  Save the sugar and starch for mealtimes, when the child is producing more saliva, and drinking water.  Make sure they consume enough water to cleanse the teeth.

  3. Lose the sippy cup – Sippy cups are thought to cause “baby bottle tooth decay” when they are used beyond the intended age (approximately twelve months).  The small amount of liquid emitted with each sip causes sugary liquid to continually swill around the teeth.

  4. Avoid stickiness – Sticky foods (like toffee) form plaque quickly and are extremely difficult to pry off the teeth.  Avoid them when possible.

  5. Rinse the pacifier – Oral bacteria can be transmitted from mother or father to baby.  Rinse a dirty pacifier with running water as opposed to sucking on it to avoid contaminating the baby’s mouth.

  6. Drinks at bedtime – Sending a child to bed with a bottle or sippy cup is bad news.  The milk, formula, juice, or sweetened water basically sits on the teeth all night – attacking enamel and maximizing the risk of cavities.  Ensure the child has a last drink before bedtime, and then brush the teeth.

  7. Don’t sweeten the pacifier – Parents sometimes dip pacifiers in honey to calm a cranky child.  Do not be tempted to do this.  Use a blanket, toy, or hug to calm the child instead.

  8. Brush and floss – Parents should brush and floss their child’s teeth twice each day until the child reaches the age of seven years old.  Before this time, children struggle to brush every area of the mouth effectively.

  9. Check on fluoride –When used correctly, fluoride can strengthen tooth enamel and help stave off cavities.  Too much or too little fluoride can actually harm the teeth, so ask the pediatric dentist for a fluoride assessment.

  10. Keep to appointments – The child’s first dental visit should be scheduled around his or her first birthday, as per the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) guidelines.  Keep to a regular appointment schedule to create healthy smiles!

 

If you have questions or concerns about cavity prevention, please contact our office.

 
MOUTH GUARDS

Mouth Guards from Dental Health Solutions 

Mouth guards, also known as sports guards or athletic mouth protectors, are crucial pieces of equipment for any child participating in potentially injurious recreational or sporting activities.  Fitting snugly over the upper teeth, mouth guards protect the entire oral region from traumatic injury, preserving both the esthetic appearance and the health of the smile.  In addition, mouth guards are sometimes used to prevent tooth damage in children who grind (brux) their teeth at night.

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) in particular, advocates for the use of dental mouth guards during any sporting or recreational activity.  Most store-bought mouth guards cost fewer than ten dollars, making them a perfect investment for every parent.

How can mouth guards protect my child?

The majority of sporting organizations now require participants to routinely wear mouth guards.   Though mouth guards are primarily designed to protect the teeth, they can also vastly reduce the degree of force transmitted from a trauma impact point (jaw) to the central nervous system (base of the brain).  In this way, mouth guards help minimize the risk of traumatic brain injury, which is especially important for younger children.

Mouth guards also reduce the prevalence of the following injuries:

  • Cheek lesions

  • Concussions

  • Gum and soft tissue injuries

  • Jawbone fractures

  • Lip lesions

  • Neck injuries

  • Tongue lesions

  • Tooth fractures

 

What type of mouth guard should I purchase for my child?

Though there are literally thousands of mouth guard brands, most brands fall into three major categories: stock mouth guards, boil and bite mouth guards, and customized mouth guards.

Some points to consider when choosing a mouth guard include:

  • How much money is available to spend?

  • How often does the child play sports?

  • What kind of sport does the child play? (Basketball and baseball tend to cause the most oral injuries).

 

In light of these points, here is an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of each type of mouth guard:

Stock mouth guards – These mouth guards can be bought directly off the shelf and immediately fitted into the child’s mouth.  The fit is universal (one-size-fits-all), meaning that that the mouth guard doesn’t adjust.  Stock mouth guards are very cheap, easy to fit, and quick to locate at sporting goods stores.  Pediatric dentists favor this type of mouth guard least, as it provides minimal protection, obstructs proper breathing and speaking, and tends to be uncomfortable.

Boil and bite mouth guards – These mouth guards are usually made from thermoplastic and are easily located at most sporting goods stores.  First, the thermoplastic must be immersed in hot water to make it pliable, and then it must be pressed on the child’s teeth to create a custom mold.  Boil and bite mouth guards are slightly more expensive than stock mouth guards, but tend to offer more protection, feel more comfortable in the mouth, and allow for easy speech production and breathing.

Customized mouth guards – These mouth guards offer the greatest degree of protection, and are custom-made by the dentist.  First, the dentist makes an impression of the child’s teeth using special material, and then the mouth guard is constructed over the mold.  Customized mouth guards are more expensive and take longer to fit, but are more comfortable, orthodontically correct, and fully approved by the dentist.

If you have questions or concerns about choosing a mouth guard for your child, please contact our office.

 
SEALING OUT TOOTH DECAY

Sealing Out Tooth Decay 

Tooth decay has become increasingly prevalent in preschoolers.  Not only is tooth decay unpleasant and painful, it can also lead to more serious problems like premature tooth loss and childhood periodontal disease.

Dental sealants are an important tool in preventing childhood caries (cavities) and tooth decay.  Especially when used in combination with other preventative measures, like biannual checkups and an excellent daily home care routine, sealants can bolster the mouth’s natural defenses, and keep smiles healthy.

How do sealants protect children’s teeth?

In general, dental sealants are used to protect molars from oral bacteria and harmful oral acids.  These larger, flatter teeth reside toward the back of the mouth and can be difficult to clean.  Molars mark the site of four out of five instances of tooth decay.  Decay-causing bacteria often inhabit the nooks and crannies (pits and fissures) found on the chewing surfaces of the molars.  These areas are extremely difficult to access with a regular toothbrush.

If the pediatric dentist evaluates a child to be at high risk for tooth decay, he or she may choose to coat additional teeth (for example, bicuspid teeth).  The sealant acts as a barrier, ensuring that food particles and oral bacteria cannot access vulnerable tooth enamel.

Dental sealants do not enhance the health of the teeth directly, and should not be used as a substitute for fluoride supplements (if the dentist has recommended them) or general oral care.  In general however, sealants are less costly, less uncomfortable, and more aesthetically pleasing than dental fillings.

How are sealants applied?

Though there are many different types of dental sealant, most are comprised of liquid plastic.  Initially, the pediatric dentist must thoroughly clean and prepare the molars, before painting sealant on the targeted teeth.  Some sealants are bright pink when wet and clear when dry.  This bright pink coloring enables the dentist to see that all pits and fissures have been thoroughly coated.

When every targeted tooth is coated to the dentist’s satisfaction, the sealant is either left to self-harden or exposed to blue spectrum natural light for several seconds (depending on the chemical composition of the specific brand).  This specialized light works to harden the sealant and cure the plastic.  The final result is a clear (or whitish) layer of thin, hard, durable sealant.

It should be noted that the “sealing” procedure is easily completed in one office visit, and is entirely painless.

When should sealants be applied?

Sealants are usually applied when the primary (baby) molars first emerge.  Depending on the oral habits of the child, the sealants may last for the life of the primary tooth, or need replacing several times.  Essentially, sealant durability depends on the oral habits of the individual child.

Pediatric dentists recommend that permanent molars be sealed as soon as they emerge.  In some cases, sealant can be applied before the permanent molar is full grown.

The health of the sealant must be monitored at biannual appointments.  If the seal begins to lift off, food particles may become trapped against the tooth enamel, actually causing tooth decay.

If you have questions or concerns about dental sealants, please contact your pediatric dentist.

 
TOBACCO USE

Tobacco Use 

Tobacco use is one of the leading causes of death in society.  Fortunately, it is also among the most preventable.  Aside from being a sociably undesirable habit, smoking can result in oral cancer, reduce smelling and tasting abilities, compromise recovery after oral surgery, stain the teeth, and increase the risk of contracting periodontal disease.  The American Dental Association (ADA) and all pediatric dentists encourage children, adolescents, and adults to abstain from all forms of tobacco use.

Almost all adult smokers have tried smoking before the age of nineteen.  In all likelihood, an individual who abstains from smoking throughout the teenage years will never pick up the habit.  Therefore, it is essential that parents strongly discourage preadolescent and adolescent tobacco use.

Is smokeless tobacco less dangerous for teens?

Tobacco use in any form brings the oral region into direct contact with carcinogens (cancer causing agents).  These carcinogens and other harmful chemicals cause irreparable damage to the child’s oral health.

Parents and teens often mistakenly evaluate smokeless tobacco as the “safer” option.  In fact, smokeless tobacco has been proven to deliver a greater concentration of harmful agents into the body, and to be far more addictive.  One snuff of tobacco has approximately the same nicotine content as sixty regular cigarettes.  In addition, smokeless tobacco causes leukoplakias in the mouth, which are dangerous pre-cancerous lesions.

What are the signs of oral cancer?

Oral cancer can be difficult to detect without the aid of the dentist.  In some cases, oral cancer is not noticeable or even painful until its later stages.  Parents of tobacco users must be aware of the following symptoms:

  • Changes in the way the teeth fit together.

  • Difficulty moving the jaw.

  • Mouth sores that don’t heal.

  • Numbness or tenderness.

  • Red or white spots on the cheek, lip, or tongue.

 

Oral cancer is treatable if caught early.  Disfiguring surgery can be avoided by having the child abstain from tobacco use and getting regular preventative dental checkups.

How can I stop my child from using tobacco?

There are several ways to discourage children and adolescents from using tobacco products.  First, talking to the child personally about the dangers of tobacco use (or asking the dentist to talk to the child) has proven an effective preventative strategy.  Second, parents should lead by example. According to research studies, children of non-smokers are less likely to pick up this dangerous habit.  Third, monitor the child closely.  If the child will not cooperate, screenings for tobacco can be requested at the dental office.

If you have questions or concerns about your childhood tobacco use, please contact your pediatric dentist.